The Silverton Murals

Where Art, History & Community come Together.

Silverton Pet Parade

Silverton Pet Parade – 2006

Another of artist David McDonald’s works, this mural was painted in 2006 and is located at 600 First Street. A tradition in Silverton for over seventy years, the first Pet Parade was led by ‘Pal,’ father of the famous local Silverton pet Bobbie. The parade takes place on the third Saturday each May and features children and adults with pets of every description. Dogs, cats, sheep, goats, chickens, sows, horses, snakes, gerbils and more have been featured in the past parades.

The Silverton Per Parade always concludes at the Eugene Field School where police and firefighters host a health and safety clinic featuring fun and games for all ages.

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Bobbie The Wonder Dog

Bobbie The Wonder Dog – 2003

Located along S. Water Street and known as Bobbie the Wonder Dog, Bobbie was a Scotch Collie who made national news back in the 1920s. Owned by the Brazier family – long time Silverton residents – Bobbie was separated from his family during a trip to Wolcott, Indiana on August 15th, 1923. The Braziers diligently searched for their beloved pet, but were forced to eventually continue their journey home without him, afraid they’d never see him again. But much to their surprise and delight Bobbie arrived at their doorstep nearly six months later, worn and weary from his 2,800 mile journey. He became a local hero and received national notoriety when his story was broadcast and people across the county claimed they had seen or helped the indomitable pet at points along his trip. 

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

 

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

 

Norma Jean

Silverton’s Sweetheart- 2014

Longtime Silverton Flower Shop owner, Norma Jean Branstetter, is depicted on this mural. She opened her shop in 1962, and was well known and loved in the community. She never seemed to known a stranger.

 

Larry was a gifted painter, photographer, typographer, writer, graphic designer, oil painter and musician. His artistic career began as an illustrator for the U.S. Airforce, then employment with several other design venues before striking out on his own in 1976. For Silverton, Larry chose to paint the Keith KaserThe Veteran’s Poem, Silverton’s Sweetheart, and Silverton Healthcare History murals like designing an oversized poster or magazine ad: engaging visuals with attention grabbing headlines and supporting text.

Murals by Larry Kassell:

 

Mammoth Camera

The Mammoth Camera – 1992

Another of  artist David McDonald’s works. It is located at 441 North Water Street and was painted in 1992. In the early days of photography, making enlargements was difficult and prohibitively expensive, especially considering that the images often came out blurred. The answer to creating large photographs was to use a large camera. The largest camera of them all was built in the United States around 1900 and was named the Mammoth. Officials of the Chicago and Alton Railroad Company has=d the camera specifically designed and built so that it could capture a single detailed photograph of their newest luxury train.

The camera’ glass plate weighed fiver hundred pounds on its own with the entire camera weighing in at over fourteen hundred pounds. It was moved about on its very own railroad car and could take as fifteen men to operate. The four-and-one-half-foot by eight photograph of the new luxury train taken by the Mammoth readily won the ‘Grand Prize of the World’ for the photographs

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Orville N. Roth

Orville N. Roth – 2014

Orville Roth opened a chain of grocery stores in the Willamette Valley with his Silverton store in 1962. Roth was a staunch supporter of local events for many years, even participating directly in some, including driving his mini-vehicle in the Homer Community Festival Parade, handing out candy to the children attending. He was a highly visible member of the community, and was involved with many organizations, often providing financial assistance.

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Our Twentieth Century

Our Twentieth Century – 2000

When artist David McDonald presented his idea for this mural, located on C Street on the side of the Napa Auto Parts building, the members of the Silverton Mural Society were eager to see it funded. Created between 2000 and 2001, Our Twentieth Century was inspired by the artist’s love of history and depicts numerous important events and individuals that helped shape this great nation over the previous century. Along with the art work, this mural includes twenty-six famous quotations that the artist feels helps to characterize this period of history.

The twenty-six quotes found in the mural:

  • Your huddled masses yearning to be free…  –  Inscription on the Statue of Liberty
  • They can have any color they want, as long as it’s black – Henry Ford concerning his Model-T
  • We won’t come back till it’s over, over there… – Lyrics from George M. Cohen marching song
  •  The war to end all wars – A hopeful sentiment after World War I
  • How you gonna keep ‘em down on the farm…? – Tune lyric from World War I
  • Don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing… – Count Basie jazz lyrics
  • When you wish upon a star – Lyric from the movie Pinocchio
  • The only thing we have to fear is fear itself… – Franklin Roosevelt’s 1933 speech
  • A date which will live in infamy… – Part of F.D.R.’s 1941 declaration of war
  • Regret to inform you – Salutation on official correspondence sent to military families
  • Nuts!… – General Anthony McAuliffe’s response when the Germans demanded his surrender
  • I am become death, shatterer of worlds – Robert Oppenheimer after witnessing the detonation of the first A-bomb
  • Don’t sit under the apple tree… – Popular WWII song lyric
  • Vita Meata Vegimin – From the I Love Lucy TV show
  • Are you now or have you ever been – Common question during the McCarthy era
  • AWOP bop aloobop ALOP BAM boom – Little Richard song lyric
  • Ask not what your country can do for you… – John F. Kennedy inauguration speech
  • We will bury you… – Soviet leader Nikita Krushev
  • I have a dream… – Martin Luther King, 1963
  • And it’s one, two, three, what are we fighting for…? – Viet Nam anti-war lyric
  • One small step for man… – Neil Armstrong on the moon
  • Where have all the flowers gone…? – Folk song from the early 1960s
  • And in the end the love you take is equal to the love you give… – Beatles lyric
  • Perestroika… – Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev’s reform policy
  • May the force be with you… – Star Wars, 1977
  • America is great collective act of imagination whose making never ends – Art critic Robert Hughes

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Silverton Red Sox

Silverton Red Sox -1999

This Silverton Red Sox mural is located on the Ace Hardware wall near C and James Streets and was painted in honor of the golden age of baseball in Silverton that lasted 18 years.

Between 1937 and 1954 Silverton residents eagerly supported their semi-pro baseball team, the Red Sox, and would regularly fills the stands at McGinnis Field to watch them play. Part of the Oregon State Semi-pro League that covered the entire Willamette Valley, The Red Sox fielded six championship teams out of the 12 years they participated. One year they were even rated third and placed nationally after placing in the national semi-pro tournament in Kansas. This mural was painted by artist Kelly Farrah in 1999.

Kelly Farrah worked at a sawmill in Georgia, as a gunfighter at Knott’s Berry Farm, worked in a flintlock gun shop, taught high school art, illustrated books, dealt in Native American quill and beadwork and reenacted as a Civil War Soldier.

He has also worked in the film industry on films such as Glory, Gettysburg, Last of the Mohicans, and the Pirates of the Carribean. Some of the paintings and props he’s made are on permanent display at the Smithsonian.

Canyon View

Canyonview – 2017

Honors Dale Price, who founded Canyonview Ministries Camp with his father-in-law Earnie Campbell in 1965. His camp name was ‘Buzzard,’ and he loved playing the guitar, served as spiritual leader of Canyonview, was instrumental in the early days of Silverton Release Time bible classes, Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast, was a founding member of the ministerial association in town, and was a nationally-known figure and speaker in Christian camping circles.

The Veteran's Poem

Veteran’s Poem – 2013

Painted by artist Larry Kassell in 2013; to date this latest addition to Silverton’s collection of murals. It is located in the parking area at 203 East Main Street and depicts Silverton’s Mural Society’s own Vince Till along with the loyal dog FeBee. Mr. Till – wearing his bib overalls locals often see him adorned in as he tends to the flower beds during his daily inspection of the murals throughout town – is shown with FeBee alongside a poem honoring the service and sacrifices of our nation’s veterans. The poem, titled: It is the Veteran, lists many of the freedoms and rights that all Americans enjoy, all due to the dedication and sacrifices made by our brave men and women in uniform.

Larry was a gifted painter, photographer, typographer, writer, graphic designer, oil painter and musician. His artistic career began as an illustrator for the U.S. Airforce, then employment with several other design venues before striking out on his own in 1976. For Silverton, Larry chose to paint the Keith KaserThe Veteran’s Poem, Silverton’s Sweetheart, and Silverton Healthcare History murals like designing an oversized poster or magazine ad: engaging visuals with attention grabbing headlines and supporting text.

Murals by Larry Kassell:

Doug Brown
Rodeo Hall of Fame

Rodeo Hall Of Fame – 2014

Following a stellar rodeo career including championships in the late 1960s, Brown was inducted into the National Rodeo Hall of Fame; the late Larry Kassell depicted the occasion with a smaller accompanying mural that joins the earlier one painted by the late Roger Cooke.

Larry was a gifted painter, photographer, typographer, writer, graphic designer, oil painter and musician. His artistic career began as an illustrator for the U.S. Airforce, then employment with several other design venues before striking out on his own in 1976. For Silverton, Larry chose to paint the Keith KaserThe Veteran’s Poem, Silverton’s Sweetheart, and Silverton Healthcare History murals like designing an oversized poster or magazine ad: engaging visuals with attention grabbing headlines and supporting text.

Murals by Larry Kassell:

Doug Brown
World Champion Cowboy

Doug Brown, World Champion Cowboy – 2009

Born in Silverton, Doug Brown won the World’s Champion Bull riding title at the National Finals Rodeo back in 1969 at the age of twenty three. This mural, located at C Street and Silverton Road, was painted by artist Roger Cooke in 2009. It depicts Brown during his 92-point ride on the saddle bronc horse, Jambalaya, at the San Bernardino California Posse Rodeo, where he won the saddle bronc riding, bull riding, and all around cowboy awards.

Roger Cooke was an American Artist and muralist. His work is best known for its historical depictions of Native American tribes. He has painted over 60 murals, many in small towns along the Oregon Trail. He built this national reputation while living and working from his studio on the bank of the Sandy River, the place he and his family loved best. In this idyllic setting, God’s creation was an inspiration and creativity flowed freely to produce the fine paintings, bronze sculptures, illustrations, murals, and portraits for which he was noted.

Silverton Air Field

Silverton Air Field – 2011

Located at First and High Streets, this mural depicts the celebration of National Airmail Week back in 1938, commemorating the 20th Anniversary of the very beginning of scheduled airmail service. During this celebration every citizen was encouraged to send or receive an airmail letter. More than 10,000 cities across the United States participated by preparing a special cachet for their airmail letters, Silverton among them. The cachet – picturing Silver Falls, an airplane, and wording – was stamped on all the airmail envelopes used on that day. The city paid for a special one day-only-pick up of the airmail letters. On May 19th of that year, 1700 special flights picked up the airmail letters from across the country. Of those flights, 47 of them were piloted by women. Pictured in the mural is local Bessie Halladay, the aviatrix who stopped for mail pickup in Silverton.

Artist Kelly Farrah created this commemorative piece in 2011.

Note: (excerpt from the mural text)

The Silverton Airfield was the first airport to be registered in Oregon, making its debut in 1915. The 1920s and 30s saw the airport as a hub of activity, between barnstorming, air circuses, crop-dusting and crashes.

Homer Davenport

Homer Davenport – 1998

This mural was painted in 1996 by artist David McDonald and is located at 205 South First Street. It depicts the world famous cartoonist and author, Homer Davenport, who never forgot about his hometown Silverton. He was born on a small local farm, grew to young manhood, and eventually married a girl named Daisy. From the start Homer had a proclivity for drawing and is was said as a boy he filled every scrap of paper he could find – as well as the planks of an old firehouse – with accurate and often humorous drawings. Later he would illustrate local newspapers and eventually became quite rich and famous. He never forgot his roots as a small town country boy and often returned to Silverton for a respite from the outside World.

Aside from writing and drawing, Homer was a huge fan of Arabian horses and was the first to bring the breed to America, where the majestic animals can be seen gracing the hills of his beloved Silverton to this day.  

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

The Old Oak Tree

The Old Oak Tree – 1995

This mural was painted by artist Lori Webb in 1995 and can be found at 213 East Main Street. During repaving projects in 1968, the stump from the famous tree was relocated under a gazebo behind the Silverton Country Museum on South Water Street. A quote from local cartoonist Homer Davenport about the stately oak:

 

“The old Silverton was given a certain dignity by a very large and remarkably shaped old oak tree that stood in the center of Main Street. It was a stately giant. The tree seemed to be the center around which we could build. A tree with stories beyond the first white man it ever saw. The old cock grouse hooting from its moss covered limbs at the break of spring. Painted Indians convening in councils of war, and finally seeing the first white man and his ox team approach. But in 1893 the giant tree g=heard its fate from a jury that were strangers. The old pioneers were away. The old oak was voted ‘guilty’ and was slain. Its huge branches were divided among the town’s people. At the stump were sad men that realized Silverton had to change. My only regret is that we couldn’t have remained the same as we were before the big oak tree was chopped down, as that tree seemed to fit our landscape better than open or paved streets do. To me the old oak always stands and under it the men play marbles.”

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

 

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

 

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Silverton City Of The Falls

Silverton City of the Falls – 1998

This mural, located at the Main Street bridge, was painted by artist Lori Webb in 1998. It is a celebration of Silver Falls State Park, which was made famous by local commercial photographer June Drake in the 1920s. At 8,706 acres, Silver Falls Park is Oregon’s largest and most popular state park. It features ten spectacular waterfalls within a four mile radius and is said to have been first seen by settlers passing through the area in April 1812. The first permanent settlers to the area – Daniel Waldo, his family, and sixty-eight head of cattle – arrived by wagon train from Independence, Missouri in 1843. The waterfalls feed Sliver Creek, which runs out of the park, through farms and forests, and meanders through the heart of our fair city.

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Don Pettit, Silverton's Astronaut

Don Pettit, Silverton’s Astronaut- 2008

Don Pettit completed two years of training and evaluation before qualifying for flight as a mission specialist.

Donald R. Pettit lives in Houston, Texas, and is married with two children. He continues to help troubleshoot space station issues on the ground.

Astronaut Pettit returned to his hometown in 2009 to act as Grand Marshall for Silverton’s annual Homer Davenport Days parade, where he presented the town with various memorabilia from his experience I space. A bulletin board hanging from the O’Brien Café is dedicated to his exploits.

Welcome back to Silverton, Earth, Don.

Don Pettit, Silverton’s Astronaut is another of artist David McDonald’s work and was painted in 2008

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

911 Memorial

The 9-11 Mural

One of David McDonald’s most powerful works. This mural not only memorializes the brave actions of those involved in the tragedy on 9-11, but also the heroes from all of America’s wars and the people who helped to shape our history. Here are the thoughts from the artist himself on this poignant work of art:

9-11

“The people, places and dates that frame the 9-11 mural represent our country’s history.

Sometimes the name, place and date are all recognizable like: John Hancock, Philadelphia, 1776.

In other instances the name, although an actual person, is obscure to a modern audience. In these cases the date and. place may inform the viewer of its meaning.

And yes, many of modern names are of local Silvertonians. These people may not exact wide historical importance, but they are valuable to us… or maybe just me.”

– David McDonald

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

The Four Freedoms

The Four Freedoms

Initially painted by artist David McDonald in 1994, this mural is located at the corner of 2nd and East Main Streets. The Four Freedoms refers to a phrase coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt during the darkest days of World War II intended to encourage the men and women of the United States Armed Forces. The painting was originally created by beloved American Artist Normal Rockwell in 1943, and first published in the Saturday Evening Post. They were carried from coast to coast by special Freedom Train to promote the purchase of war bonds. Fifty years later the city of Silverton commissioned artist David McDonald to reproduce the famous painting as a mural. It stands as a proud reminder of the sacrifices made by the men and women of the Armed Forces in the yester-years as well as today.

 

The Four Freedoms Placard – 2015

 

The original Four Freedoms mural was painted on the old Masonic Lodge on Main Street. The old lodge was razed in 2015 and replaced with the MAPS Credit Union. The cost of moving the Normal Rockwell’s Four Freedoms mural was too expensive to move and a without guarantee of success.

 

The building owner and the city raised moneys to repaint the mural and commissioned artist Tonya Smithburg to repaint the Four Freedoms Mural in its current location at 990 North 1st Street in 2015. The Placard was placed onsite to memorialize the repainting of the Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms mural.

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Dogwood

Dogwood – 2017

This mural depicts the transition of the community from a lumber town in its early days into Oregon’s Garden City. In the lower-center of the mural, there is a log with an ax embedded in it, showing the initials W.O.W. The building was originally built for the Woodmen of the World, a fraternal organization, in 1907. It was home to the American Legion for many years, beginning in 1945.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail – 1992

This mural, painted by David McDonald in 1992, is located at 1787 Pine Street. It was created in the honor of those who demonstrated the pioneering spirit and traveled west, despite the hardships, to seek a new start in a new frontier. The Oregon Trail depicts Henry Boyington family, who traveled west in the 1850s, as they paused in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains after many hard hours along the Oregon Trail. s.

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Gallon House Bridge

Gallon House Bridge – 2000

Artist Lori Webb painted this mural, located at the corner of Lewis and South Water Streets, in 2000. It depicts the Gallon House Bridge, an eighty-four foot structure that is the only covered bridge in Marion County that people can still drive through. The bridge was dubbed the Gallon House Bridge back during prohibition when locals knew it as the place to pick up a bottle of moonshine or steal a kiss from a pretty girl. Here is the poem by the mural’s artist:

 

The Gallon House Bridge Poem by Lori Webb 2000

Return to a day
When they’d steal away
To sneak a kiss,
Or moonshine, or fish
Neath the old covered bridge

They named it the Gallon House
After a place near by
Cross the Abiqua
To Mount Angel
When Silverton was ‘dry’

In Nineteen hundred
And seventeen
Built to last
The years have passed
Oh, the stories it has seen.

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Mr. and Mrs. Claus

 

Mr. and Mrs. Claus – 2002

Located on the Town Square Park off Main Street, this mural was painted by artist Roger Cooke in 2002. It was inspired by local resident Bruce Scoville who had a long standing tradition of transforming himself into the jolly old elf every Christmas season. Truly dedicated to his par, Scoville would spend a full day at the local beauty salon getting his hair and beard properly bleached for the role. Not only would he visit private homes to the delight of local children, he also allowed families to sign up to have lunch with Santa at O-Brien’s Café and was a favorite at Silverton Hospital.

Roger Cooke was an American Artist and muralist. His work is best known for its historical depictions of Native American tribes. He has painted over 60 murals, many in small towns along the Oregon Trail. He built this national reputation while living and working from his studio on the bank of the Sandy River, the place he and his family loved best. In this idyllic setting, God’s creation was an inspiration and creativity flowed freely to produce the fine paintings, bronze sculptures, illustrations, murals, and portraits for which he was noted.

Silverton Healthcare History

Silverton Healthcare – 2016

This depiction, painted by the late Larry Kassell on panels that show the three Silverton hospitals beginning with the original Keene Hospital, the second facility opened in the 1920s, and the third facility that was built in the late 1930s which still stands following multiple expansions and remodelings.

Larry was a gifted painter, photographer, typographer, writer, graphic designer, oil painter and musician. His artistic career began as an illustrator for the U.S. Airforce, then employment with several other design venues before striking out on his own in 1976. For Silverton, Larry chose to paint the Keith KaserThe Veteran’s Poem, Silverton’s Sweetheart, and Silverton Healthcare History murals like designing an oversized poster or magazine ad: engaging visuals with attention grabbing headlines and supporting text.

Murals by Larry Kassell:

Arabian Quest

Arabian Quest 

When Homer Davenport, the famous cartoonist who put Silverton on the map, was visiting the World’s Fair in New York City in 1902, he befriended an Arabian sheikh who was a breeder of horses. Through this association he was able to receive a small herd of twenty-seven purebred Arabian horses after a visit to Arabia in 1906. These were the very first of the desert-bred Arabian horses to arrive in America and became known as the Davenport Arabians. Descendants of this original herd can still be spotted along the hillsides and in pastures of the town.

Painted by Lori Webb in 2006, this mural graces the wall of the Wolf Building on North Water Street. 

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Keith Kaser

Keith Kaser (Silverton’s own unique citizen)   – 2011 

Though he served in the army and was an accomplished mechanic, most residents of Silverton knew Keith Kaser as either The Walking Man of Silverton or simply as Walking Keith. A common sight since returning to the city in 1991, Keith, with his white beard and cap pulled low on his head, was known for making his rounds of the city on foot, offering a raised hand in greeting or comments on the weather to friends and strangers alike. One of his favorite quips on a rainy day was to hold his hand out to catch the falling rain and say: “I was thinking about bringing my umbrella, but I was afraid it might get wet.”

Mechanically adept since childhood, Keith earned a mechanic degree from Oregon Technical Institute and specialized in repairing Volkswagens for over 30 years. He passed away in 2010 and the following year Keith’s family commissioned Silverton artist Larry Kassell to paint this mural dedicated to his memory in 2011. It is located at Lewis and Seconds Streets.

Larry was a gifted painter, photographer, typographer, writer, graphic designer, oil painter and musician. His artistic career began as an illustrator for the U.S. Airforce, then employment with several other design venues before striking out on his own in 1976. For Silverton, Larry chose to paint the Keith KaserThe Veteran’s Poem, Silverton’s Sweetheart, and Silverton Healthcare History murals like designing an oversized poster or magazine ad: engaging visuals with attention grabbing headlines and supporting text.

Murals by Larry Kassell:

Paws For Love

Paws for Love  – 2009

Painted by artist Kathryn Bennett in 2009, this mural is located at 306 Oak Street. It was created in honor of the therapy dog program that was in effect at the Silver Falls Library for several years. The program incorporated trained therapy dogs to encourage and develop a love of reading and learning in general. The dogs would listen as children read to them; the children feeling at ease since the dogs would not correct them should they make a mistake. These dogs and their owners underwent special training and followed strict guidelines when working with the children and adults. The therapy dogs were also trained to visit individuals at nursing homes or in hospitals. All previous murals in Silverton had been painted in oils, but Ms. Bennett asked Silverton Mural Society if she could use Nova Colors, acrylics designed specifically for use outdoors. It proved to be an excellent choice, since in five years since it was originally painted there are no indications of fading, cracking or peeling.

 

June Drake

June Drake – 2018

June Drake was a prolific photographer in Silverton from 1904 until his death in 1969. His studio was on North Water Street for many years, which served as a showcase for his many photos and historic objects he collected. He considered his greatest achievement to be in successfully lobbying the state legislature to designate the ten waterfalls and land surrounding them as Silver Falls State Park, which was dedicated in July 1933.

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Christmas Market

Christmas Market – 2021

Lori Rodrigues, Formerly Webb was born and raised in Central Oregon. She took up art as a child, often drawing so large that her subjects fell off the page. 

Moving to the Willamette Valley in 1992, Lori was Inspired by Silverton’s rich history.  She heard stories about the famous old oak tree, ‘Bobbie the Wonder Dog’, Homer Davenport’s quest to bring Arabian horses to America. Visiting the museum, she saw images captured by a man soon to become her hero, photographer June Drake, credited with saving Silver Falls as a state park. Rodrigues began painting murals on these stories in 1995. With more than 20 murals, her projects can be seen in several Oregon State Parks, Heritage Sites, at the state fairgrounds, in Saint Paul, and throughout Silverton.

Lori has been an artist at Lunaria Gallery since 2006 and works mostly in acrylics and watercolors. She is also available for commissioned projects, large and small. She is now dedicated to her art full time at Silver Stream Studio. 

Website: silverstreamstudio.com

Email: lori@silverstreamstudio.com 

Social Media: Instagram @silverstreamstudio

https://www.facebook.com/SilverStreamStudio

Silver Falls Timber Company

Silver Falls Timber Company – 2003

Built in 1916, the Silver Falls Timber Company was one of the largest sawmills in Oregon. It ran two shifts and employed close to five hundred workers. At capacity the mill could produce up to 250,000 feet of lumber during each ten hour run. Located off Hobart Road, the mill had timber holdings of about 30,000 acres located in both Marion and Clackamas counties. The mill’s owner, Mr. McGinnis, was a renowned fan of baseball and supported the Silverton Red Sox semi-pro baseball team for many years. This mural, located on First Street at the end of Garden City Storage, was painted in 2003 by Artist David McDonald. It depicts tow ‘Pond Monkeys’ moving logs to the green chain, with the mill building in the background.

 

David made his first mural on wide paper tacked to the walls while in elementary school. While serving in the U.S. Army, David painted pictures on the barrack walls in his free time.

David has worked in the theatre as a set designer. Although he has worked in many facets of art, he enjoys murals the most.

David says, “climbing on a scaffold in the fresh air bringing a little color and interest to a big blank wall…that’s a satisfying challenge.”

David works at Roth’s Fresh Market in Silverton, hand illustrating in-store chalk signs.

Murals by David McDonald:

Harvey Mikkelsen Steam-up

Harvey Mikkelsen Steam – up – 2013

This mural, located on First Street on the side of the Silverton Elks Lodge, was painted in 2013 by artist Tonya Smithburg. It is dedicated to those days between 1954 and 1966 when Silverton had an annual festival and parade of threshing machines that started off the beginning of each harvest season. The festival was held on the Mikkelson farm located off Pine Street, and during its most popular years was said to have had over 10,000 people in attendance. The festival featured threshing bees to celebrate and prepare for the upcoming harvest. Aside from the festival, a parade of local threshers and steam engines made its way through the streets of Silverton. This mural was commissioned by Harvey Mikkelson’s daughter, who lives on the Pine Street farm where she still has many of her father’s antique steam engines and farming equipment.

Tonya Smithburg has been repairing murals in Silverton since 2009 when Lori Webb introduced her to the Mural Society. Since then, every summer she goes around to assess the damage from the weather and sets to work restoring. In 2012 Tonya received her first mural project: The Harvey Mikkelson Steam-Up Festival located on the side of the Elks Lodge. 

 

Then in 2014 the opportunity to recreate the Norman Rockwell Four Freedom Murals was presented. The murals had been previously painted in town twenty years earlier by David McDonald but then the building was torn down in 2014. The murals took Tonya two years to complete. They were painted on panels on what was then Seven Brides Brewery. 

 

Tonya has been an artist her whole life working in mostly acrylic and oil paints. Her original artwork can be found sprinkled about in businesses in downtown Silverton. 

 

Fischer Flour Mill

Fischer Flour Mill –  2023

The newest Silverton Mural Society’s mural will be displayed at the Silver Falls Library covered walkway. Artist Tonya Smithburg will be painting the mural depicting the historic Fischer Flour Mill operation. The Mill operated in the early 19th century on the same site where the library stands today.

Tonya Smithburg has been repairing murals in Silverton since 2009 when Lori Webb introduced her to the Mural Society. Since then, every summer she goes around to assess the damage from the weather and sets to work restoring. In 2012 Tonya received her first mural project: The Harvey Mikkelson Steam-Up Festival located on the side of the Elks Lodge. 

 

Then in 2014 the opportunity to recreate the Norman Rockwell Four Freedom Murals was presented. The murals had been previously painted in town twenty years earlier by David McDonald but then the building was torn down in 2014. The murals took Tonya two years to complete. They were painted on panels on what was then Seven Brides Brewery. 

 

Tonya has been an artist her whole life working in mostly acrylic and oil paints. Her original artwork can be found sprinkled about in businesses in downtown Silverton. 

 

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